In Memory of Dividend Mantra – How to Kill a Blog in 10 Weeks

Nov 18

In Memory of Dividend Mantra – How to Kill a Blog in 10 Weeks

At the end of the day, the new owners have a website with a bunch of articles they don’t understand.

Jason has new money in his account and the brand to continue to succeed.

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How to Handle Joint Living Expenses

Sep 22

It’s common knowledge that money is a primary cause of fighting and the ending of long-term relationships.

That’s why when Ms. Red to Riches and I decided to purchase a house together, we knew we had to develop a game plan on how to handle our finances in order to reduce the likelihood of future problems.

While I do not think we have the best process for managing joint expenses, I do believe some of the basic concepts could be applied to your present or future situation.

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How Much is Your Minimum Monthly Cash Outflow?

Aug 23

How Much is Your Minimum Monthly Cash Outflow?

If you lost your job on August 30th, how long could you financially survive until you default on debt or have no money to feed yourself and/or family?

There are a lot of topics out there regarding how much money to keep in an emergency fund “keep 3 months’ worth of expenses, keep 6 months, 1 year, etc. Well, that advice is not useful if you don’t have an idea of what your monthly expenses are.

Although I would recommend tracking your expenses for a few months to gain a baseline, there is a quick way to estimate it through a financial exercise.

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Why I Have a Car Loan – A Questionable Decision

May 12

One of the two major expense categories that prevent people from achieving a high savings rate is housing and transportation. These categories are not independent of each other. For example, choosing to live in 30 miles away from your primary employment will dictate your transportation expenses. Living near public transportation or within biking distance can shed years off of your working life. I am a proponent on low transportation expenses, but if you review my current net worth, you will notice a car loan. This article discusses the situation I was in at the time (and not fully in sync with early retirement), my thought process, and how my more recent decision of moving near my employment may remedy the dependence on having a vehicle.   Bye Bye Contour In December 2013, I had a decision to make: my car was falling apart and I needed to do something about it. I had a 2001 Ford Contour with about 150,000 miles on it. It was the vehicle given to me by my dad when I went off to college. Although it was meant to just get me through college, it lasted a bit longer with no major repairs. The driver door handle would often get stuck and needed to be pulled a certain way to open the door, the engine would stall in the cold at stop lights, and the car completely shut off several times while I was driving. Estimated repair costs were over $1,000. If I included routine maintenance that I put off because of the potential it would just die completely (brakes and tires were in rough shape), I would have likely have had to at least double that number. As a result, I decided it was time to look for a new and more reliable car. The good news? Although it had a few major dents, no air conditioning, a decent amount of rust, and was a bit outdated, I was still able to take Ms. Red to Riches out on a few dates and win her over with it!   The Search Since my Contour was handed down to me through family, this was my first real car search. At this time, many similar...

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